Monday, July 06, 2015

The search for truth continues.

TCM are always a source of joy and inspiration. In a paper published recently by those wacky dudes at Michigan State University they explain that some time ago someone estimated the quantity of some stuff that we cannot see but now someone else has said that this quantity is too high, and that there may be less stuff that no bugger can see out in a part of the universe that we can never travel to. So, when we get there, which we never will because it is impossible, there is less stuff to bump into which would make the impossible travel less risk-prone. This is, naturally, a great comfort to me as I begin the task of looking for affordable holiday destinations in my retirement – I don’t want to go anyplace that is crowded. On the other hand, this is a great source of anguish to me as I begin the task of looking for affordable holiday destinations in my retirement – there may be many fewer options from which to choose. On the other hand I may prefer not to visit these “dimmer galaxies” – the bright ones, as their name suggests, may be preferable anyway; who, after all, wants to be stumbling around in the dark looking for the kitchen when billions of light years away from home.


Once again, the ruminations of the physics community has done nothing to help with the practical issues facing us daily, and I am beginning to doubt the worth of my grade 3 CSE physics certificate, wherever it is. Perhaps the staff of MSU can help me look.

10 comments:

Zig said...

I have an O level in physics which I believe trumps your CSE so take it from me if you moved a little faster time would pass more slowly and if you went fast enough you could arrive at a time when quantum mechanics allow us to be everywhere at once so you could visit wherever you so please because you’ll already be there In the first instance you need to get away from your computer screen, off your arse and start jogging. Hope this helps.

Vicus Scurra said...

I was interested to see how rapidly the imparting of valid scientific data degenerated into what appears to be nagging. Is there a named law that describes this effect? Did you study science at the Nora Batty Institute, perchance?

Vicus Scurra said...

I must have typed that last comment very quickly because it appeared twice.

Z said...

Too much choice isn't always helpful, I find. It can lead to a search for perfection - or at least a concern that there is always something better to be found the moment one has committed oneself - and few things really matter that much. My son has an A Level in Physics (I have nothing, so have to get my bragging in where I can) so I could ask him, if you like? I'd need a precise question though, I don't understand anything you've said so far.

Vicus Scurra said...

I fear, Z, that an A level in Physics is probably a sign that either he has been brainwashed by the scientific community and is unable to form a sensible opinion, or, and I hope this is the case, has sufficient understanding of the subject to know that it presents no answers, only conflicting and constantly changing opinions about the nature of existence. My only question for him would be why he chose to study magnetic fields instead of the poet Keats, and how much does he regret the decision.

Z said...

Roman was in the experiment year, the first to take KS1 and KS3 SATs, the first to take AS Levels and, in a short-lived but encouraging time of enlightenment, channelled towards taking both science and arts subjects. So he took history as well as physics - and other subjects - and chose History to read at university. He hasn't used his degree, of course, he now does things I don't understand on computers.

Z said...

Ronan. Sodding auto-correct.

Zig said...

Actually I have an A level in physics as well but didn't want you to feel too stupid.

Dave said...

Did you grow your third hand on your travels in time and space?

Vicus Scurra said...

Hello Dave, no, pay attention please, I do not travel in time and space, that is Maya.